Elections 2012: What’s your opinion?

The Tacoma Weekly's Kathleen Merryman took to the streets this week asking people their thoughts on this year's elections. Here is what she found out.

Nan Bohanan, 77, Tacoma

Q) Where do you get your political news?

A) “TV and newspaper primarily.”

Q) What seals your deal? Ads, debates, candidates’ records, long-held political views…?

A) “Some or all, probably records more than anything. I have paid very close attention to the debates, and for once they were worthwhile.”

Q) Do you talk about politics with people who disagree with you? How does it go?

A) “Unfortunately I do talk politics with people if they agree or disagree. If they don’t it’s not so good. I’m from Kentucky and have a lot of relatives who live back there. You can only keep your mouth closed so long. We have had some heated debates.”

Q) On a scale of 1 to 10, what’s your level of ad nausea?

A) “I am sick of the ads. I feel they are not accomplishing anything with them. They are not giving information.”

Q) Do you judge people by their yard signs? Bumper stickers?

A) “No. I just look at them as garbage on the street. When I rule the world there won’t be any.”

Q) Want to tell us more?

A) “In this particular race, I could be listed as undecided.”

Julie Kappelman, 20, Tacoma, student at University of Puget Sound

Q) Where do you get your political news?

A) “I normally go to the New York Times online.”

Q) What seals your deal? Ads, debate, candidates’ records, long-held political views?

A) “The candidate’s record. Ads can be pretty misleading, and so can debates, which are a one-time thing. A record says more than a thing at a given point in history.”

Q) Do you talk about politics with people who disagree with you? How does it go?

A) “I don’t talk politics too often with too many people. I was raised in Alabama so I have had some interesting conversations with friends and people from the West Coast with very different political views. Sometimes there is a point where the conversation stops.”

Q) On a scale of 1 to 10, what’s your level of ad nausea?

A) “I don’t have a television, but I’d still say an 8 or a 9. They don’t appeal to me at all.”

Q) Do you judge people by their yard signs? Bumper stickers?

A) “I would say no.”

John Hansen, 47, Graham

Q) Where do you get your political news?

A) “Radio news, the newspaper, my iPhone, FOX and USA Today.”

Q) What seals your deal? Ads, debate, candidates’ records, long-held political views?

A) “Long-held political views and the candidate’s record.”

Q) Do you talk about politics with people who disagree with you? How does it go?

A) “I will talk to anybody, but I am not going to argue. I will debate. I was on the debate team. But if people go off track and get emotional, we’ll change the subject. I’m not going to change them, and they’re definitely not going to change me.”

Q) On a scale of 1 to 10, what’s your level of ad nausea?

A) “I pretty much ignore them.”

Q) Do you judge people by their yard signs? Bumper stickers?

A) “I don’t know a lot of people with yard signs, but it’s hard not to judge people by their political beliefs.”

Q) Want to tell us more?

A) “When I was in kindergarten, I was telling kids why their parents needed to vote for Nixon. Vote for the Romney of your choice.”

Bradley Wayne, 34, Puyallup

Q) Where do you get your political news?

A) “I read political books, listen to talk radio 770, and watch lots of news.”

Q) What seals your deal? Ads, debate, candidates’ records, long-held political views?

A) “Ads and debates don’t seal it for me. I pretty much know before the debates. I look at their records and views and how they’ve voted for things.”

Q) Do you talk about politics with people who disagree with you? How does it go?

A) “I do talk politics with people. I try to keep it civil. I can sometimes be a little aggressive.”

Q) On a scale of 1 to 10, what’s your level of ad nausea?

Q) Do you judge people by their yard signs? Bumper stickers?

A) “I used to not, but I do now. There are some political views I find hard to ignore.”

Q) Want to tell us more?

A) “I think our country is so divided now, it affects relationships more than before.”

Athena Nation, 41, Tacoma, student at Evergreen College

Q) Where do you get your political news?

A) “Mostly I get a lot from AP and Reuters, maybe a little of Huffington Post. I like ‘The Colbert Report’ and Bill Mahar.”

Q) What seals your deal? Ads, debate, candidates’ records, long-held political views?

A) “I vote for the people who built our country. A candidate of substance. A worker among workers.”

Q) Do you talk about politics with people who disagree with you? How does it go?

A) “Absolutely. They teach me about my level of tolerance and my level of political literacy. I refuse to argue, but I tend to be passionate.”

Q) On a scale of 1 to 10, what’s your level of ad nausea?

A) “Aagh. Yeah, 15, or 10 to the 25th power.”

Q) Do you judge people by their yard signs? Bumper stickers?

A) “I hate to admit it, but on occasion, yes, I am quick to judge… When you start putting up political signs, it lets me know where you stand. It always lingers.”

Q) Want to tell us more?

A) “When I walk around with my seven-year-old son, he asks questions, about why the elephant and what that color means. I try to be very objective, so he can form his own opinions. My father did that for me, and I am doing it for my son.”

Cheryl Clark, 51, Tacoma

Q) Where do you get your political news?

A) “Newspapers, TV, friends and my ex-pastor. He’s a man of God. He moved to Portland.”

Q) What seals your deal? Ads, debate, candidates’ records, long-held political views?

A) “Their beliefs. Their Christian values.”

Q) Do you talk about politics with people who disagree with you? How does it go?

A) “No. It’s annoying.”

Q) On a scale of 1 to 10, what’s your level of ad nausea?

A) “I don’t watch ads. I record shows and scroll right through them.”

Q) Do you judge people by their yard signs? Bumper stickers?

Q) “No. Everybody has their own views. I don’t want anyone judging me.”

Zak Mohammed, 18, Kent

Q) Where do you get your political news?

A) “From my Yahoo, online, mostly, and CNN.”

Q) What seals your deal? Ads, debate, candidates’ records, long-held political views?

A) “Friends and family.”

Q) Do you talk about politics with people who disagree with you? How does it go?

A) “I talk about it. I try to be civil.”

Q) On a scale of 1 to 10, what’s your level of ad nausea?

A) “I don’t pay attention to them.”

Q) Do you judge people by their yard signs? Bumper stickers?

A) “No.”

Peter Pentescu, 27, Auburn, student at University of Washington-Tacoma

Q) Where do you get your political news?

A) “Mostly online. A mix of CNN, AP, Reuters, Publicola and the Seattle Times.”

Q) What seals your deal? Ads, debate, candidates’ records, long-held political views?

A) “I do a little bit of volunteer work with Bob Ferguson’s campaign.”

Q) Do you talk about politics with people who disagree with you? How does it go?

A) “Yes, with people who agree and disagree. Even when people disagree, they are usually civil face to face.”

Q) On a scale of 1 to 10, what’s your level of ad nausea?

A) “The e-mails have got to stop. You sign up to work for one campaign, and they will never stop asking you for money.”

Q) Do you judge people by their yard signs? Bumper stickers?

A) “I try not to judge people by who they are voting for.”

Comments

Gessel Orthodontic University Dental

Letter to the Editor

If you would like to contact us directly, please submit a Letter to the Editor here.