news

Sunday, February 07, 2016 This Week's Paper

Bulletin Board

  • submit to reddit
  • submit to reddit
The Gallery Stogie's City of Tacoma - Minimum Wage T-Town apparel Clear Choice Cannabis Emerald Queen Casino

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW CONTINUES FOR METHANOL FACILITY

The City of Tacoma will hold the second of three public meetings Feb. 10 about the scope of the environmental review for a proposed methanol facility at the Port of Tacoma. 
The City is the lead agency for the facility’s environmental review under the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA). The process will analyze the likely environmental impacts, feasible alternatives and measures to avoid or minimize adverse impacts. 
Northwest Innovation Works is proposing to build a facility at the port to convert natural gas to methanol. The methanol would be used as feedstock in Asia to produce olefin, a compound used in such consumer goods as cell phones, plastic components and carpet fibers. The cleaner-burning methanol would help reduce China’s reliance on higher-emission coal and petroleum. 
At the second meeting Feb. 10, the City will accept comments on the draft scope of the environmental review, which will be available on the City’s website Feb. 5. The meeting begins at 6:30 p.m. at the Greater Tacoma Convention and Trade Center, 1500 Broadway in Tacoma. 
The third and final scoping meeting, also about the draft scope, is scheduled for Feb. 16 at Meeker Middle School, 4402 Nassau Ave. NE in Tacoma. Oral and written comments will be accepted at the two final meetings. The scoping process deadline has been extended to 5 p.m. March 4. Learn more at www.cityoftacoma.org.

STADIUM TO HOST MASSING OF COLORS CEREMONY

The 2016 Massing of the Colors ceremony celebrating George Washington's birthday will be held on Sunday, Feb. 21, 3 p.m. at the Stadium High School gymnasium hosted by Stadium High School Admiral James S. Russell, Navy Junior ROTC Unit. Massing of the Colors is a patriotic ceremony honoring those who have served the United States of America and honoring the youth of today who carry on the patriotic tradition. Massing of the Colors will add I Corps Army Band to this patriotic theme. The world-class I Corps Army Band creates bonds between the United States Army and the Pacific Northwest community. Come and enjoy their inspiring selection of music celebrating George Washington, our first Patriot and the long line of patriots who have served our country well. Come early to be seated for the band concert that starts promptly at 3 pm. Free parking at Stadium garage and on-street.

PROJECT PEACE HOLDS CULMINATING EVENT

The Project PEACE (Partnering for Equity and Community Engagement) Community Conversation Series, which kicked off in September, will wrap up with a culminating event on Feb. 8 from 6-8:30 p.m. at the Greater Tacoma Convention & Trade Center in the Main Ballroom located on the third floor. Doors will open at 5:30 p.m.
The event, which is hosted by the Tacoma Police Department and the City of Tacoma, will include a review of the information collected during the community conversations; the Tacoma Police Department will present its proposed action items in response to the feedback; and residents will have the opportunity to help prioritize the proposed action items.
The event is free and open to the public. For more information about the event, to pre-register or for parking information, visit the website at cityoftacoma.org/projectpeace.

The Grand Cinema Presents
The Annual Film Awards Party
As the South Sound’s home of independent film, The Grand Cinema proudly invites movie lovers to celebrate the Oscars in style at our annual Film Awards Party on Sunday, Feb. 28 at Theatre on the Square. Doors to the party open at 4 p.m. and Oscar coverage begins at 5 p.m.
Each year, The Grand Cinema rolls out the red carpet and invites everyone to participate in an interactive celebration of the Oscar nominated films of the year. The tradition continues this February with a live broadcast of the 88th annual Academy Awards ceremony with hosted entertainment from local personalities including former TEDx Tacoma host Adam Utley and local actor Paul Richter (both members of Muh Grog Zoo improv group); Grand board member and veteran event host, Jordan Hightower; and costume atelier and host for the Gritty City Sirens, Ricky German.
Attendees are encouraged to dust off their formal wear for this red carpet event or dress as their favorite character from any film from 2015. Costume contest participants will be entered for a chance to win a gift certificate to the Melting Pot ($300 worth of gift certificates will be split among costume winners). See last year's photos. A list of the 19 Oscar-nominated films that played at The Grand in 2015 is available at http://www.grandcinema.com/film-awards-party
. Giveaways and raffle prizes will be awarded throughout the night, and at least one lucky attendee will win a “Golden Ticket” to The Grand Cinema – good for free movies for a year (for the winner only) in our Predict the Winners contest. Local restaurants will provide delicious food for purchase, and former owner and mixologist from Hilltop Kitchen, Chris Keil, will be serving special cocktails at the event. Beer and local wine will also be available at a no host bar.
Guests can support The Grand by participating in a silent auction. All proceeds will support The Grand’s operations and programs.
VIP guests will have full event access between the private VIP seating area and general admission stadium seating to enjoy the costume contest and entire ceremony. Dinner in the VIP room will be catered by the head chef from Europa Bistro.
This event has sold out in the past several years, and those who want to attend are encouraged to reserve tickets early. VIP tickets have already sold out and only half of the tickets in general admission are still available.
Although we’ll be watching the Oscars on the big screen, this event is not sponsored by or affiliated with The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.
General admission tickets are $20 ($15 for Grand members) and include event entry and bottled water. Food is available for purchase.
Tickets to The Grand Cinema’s annual Film Awards Party are on sale now and are available at The Grand’s Box Office (606 S. Fawcett Ave.), are available at www.GrandCinema.com, or by calling (253) 593-4474.

HECK CALLS FOR VALENTINES FOR VETERANS

For the fourth annual Valentines for Veterans Drive, Congressman Denny Heck is encouraging students of all ages around the South Sound to pen and design valentines for local veterans. The cards are one way to say to veterans, “thank you for your service.”  
Heck and his office will then deliver the cards to veteran organizations on Valentine’s Day.
“We are privileged to live among more than 81,000 veterans in the South Sound, and we have hundreds of thousands of creative students to help us out with some beautiful valentines,” Heck said. “Every year the handmade cards from our talented students pour in, and there is nothing better than seeing the look on the veterans’ faces when we make the delivery.”
Students of all grade levels and ages are welcome to participate. Anyone wishing to participate can drop off Valentine’s Day cards at Congressman Heck’s district offices between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, prior to or on Feb. 12.
The Pierce County office is located in the William Factory Small Business Incubator at 1423 E. 29th St., Ste. 203 in Tacoma.
 Participants with questions can call the Congressman’s offices at (253) 722-5860 for Pierce County.

SHOW YOUR T-TOWN LOVE WITH #IHEARTTACOMA2016

This February the City of Tacoma’s Historic Preservation Office is inviting residents to show their love for Historic Preservation by competing in the #IHeartTacoma2016 Design Contest.
To participate, post a Tacoma Historic Preservation inspired design and/or slogan idea to Instagram, Twitter or Facebook using #IHeartTacoma2016. The contest will run through the month of February and the most “liked” idea will be used on Historic Preservation promotional pieces, including a bumper sticker, and debuted during the May 2016 Historic Preservation Month festivities.
“We thought this design contest would be a great way for people to get involved and show that they care about Tacoma’s heritage and historic resources,” said Historic Preservation Coordinator Lauren Hoogkamer.
To have your positive and appropriate for a general audience design and/or slogan idea posted, send them to Lauren Hoogkamer at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address), call (253) 591-5254 or for more information, visit cityoftacoma.org/HistoricPreservation.
APPLY NOW FOR TACOMA MURALS PROJECT

In support of the City of Tacoma’s ongoing efforts to strategically revitalize and beautify Tacoma, the Tacoma Murals Project is seeking applications from community groups interested in collaborating with local artists who will design and implement painted outdoor murals that reflect positive neighborhood themes or messages. The deadline for submissions is midnight on March 14.
“The strength of the Tacoma Murals Project is its ability to reflect the diverse voices of our community while creating beautiful artworks that can be catalysts for change,” said Tacoma Arts Administrator Amy McBride. “These murals help create a sense of place and identity, and provide a welcoming entry into our many unique neighborhoods.”
Each selected community group will receive a funded mural that includes artist supplies and artist compensation, an artist or artist team from a roster provided by the City, technical assistance and general promotion of the project.
In return, each selected community group would be responsible for contributing in-kind services and materials as required to prepare their mural wall, participating in the selection of an artist/artist team from a City-provided roster, coordinating community meetings and the dedication of their completed mural, and maintaining their mural after completion.
Community groups must, with property owner permission, propose specific mural walls. Proposed mural walls must be on commercial or public property and located within Tacoma city limits. Priority will be given to sites located in areas without a good representation of public art and/or that are highly visible to the public.
It is tentatively projected that five mural sites will be selected for 2016.
Twenty-seven murals have been completed between 2010 and 2015. Photos of these murals are available on the Completed Murals page on the City’s website at www.cityoftacoma.org, where full project details, and the application, are also available online. Additional information is available from Naomi Strom-Avila at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or (253) 591-5191.

CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OPENS CHILDCARE FACILITY

On Feb. 8 the Children’s Museum of Tacoma will open a new, licensed childcare facility in downtown Tacoma. The Muse: A Children’s Center is a program of the Children’s Museum of Tacoma in collaboration with UW Tacoma. Located at 1501 Pacific Ave. in the lower level of the United Way Building, which also houses the Children’s Museum of Tacoma, the center will serve approximately 70 children aged 18 months to five years old. The Muse will give priority enrollment to children of students, faculty and staff of University of Washington Tacoma, but will also offer additional openings for community members interested in its services.
The partnership between the Museum and University that produced The Muse was created to accomplish two goals- provide quality, accessible child care for students and faculty of the University; and to create a childcare model for our community that demonstrates best practices, inspired environments, and child-centered learning philosophies. Debra Friedman, former UW Tacoma chancellor, said of the partnerships, “This has to be bigger than our organizations.” The vision for the The Muse is that it becomes a model center and partner to other centers in our community, working to raise quality for all our community’s children. Both partners see this as a long-term partnership with large community benefit.
“The Children’s Museum of Tacoma should be commended for bold vision. We are thrilled to join forces to meet immediate student need, and also to leverage our experiences for the betterment of all children in our community,” said Mark Pagano, Chancellor, University of Washington Tacoma, of the program.
The Muse: A Children’s Center emphasizes a child-centered approach to early learning that is inspired by the schools of Reggio Emilia, Italy, where the image of the child is seen as capable, competent and with high potential. At the heart of this approach to early childhood education are the relationships between families, children and teachers. At The Muse families will be welcomed to participate in their child’s learning, and to partner with teachers and children as they explore the environment.
The newly renovated space was designed by local BCRA Architects and provides a beautiful environment, which invites wonder, curiosity, joy and discovery. Included in the design of The Muse is the Studio, a place for open-ended art exploration that encourages collaboration and investigation with materials. Playground-ish will be The Muse’s own backyard. Intended to closely resemble a naturally growing backyard, Playground-ish includes sculptures, kitchen gardens, and exploration of natural materials, music and gross motor play.
The Muse will operate Monday through Friday from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Ages include children 18 months to five years old. For more information, including tuition rates, application process, or to request a tour, visit www.PlayTacoma.org/themuse.

UPDATE: TACOMA MALL NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN

The City of Tacoma is currently developing a Subarea Plan and Environmental Impact Study (EIS) for the Tacoma Mall Neighborhood. The effort will result in a plan and implementation strategies to achieve local and regional goals for the neighborhood, as well as up-front environmental approval for future development that is consistent with the plan. The study area is 601-acres including the current 485-acre Center and a proposed 116-acre expansion area.
Between July and November 2015, the City conducted a major public and stakeholder engagement effort, including multiple public meetings and events culminating in a multi-day Design Workshop. Since that time, the project team has worked to assemble and analyze data, synthesize public input, and identify strategies to meet community objectives for the neighborhood. Several new documents are available on the project webpage, including summaries of public comments to date, of the EIS Scoping process, and of the September Design Workshop.
The project is now entering a new phase. From February to June 2016, the City will build on this work to develop the Draft Plan and Draft EIS. This phase will include a second focused effort to engage the community. Additional public meetings will be scheduled for March through May 2016.
For more information, visit www.tacomamallneighborhood.com.
Contact project staff with any questions: Elliott Barnett at (253) 591-5389; Molly Harris at (253) 591-5383 or email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

BLOCKER LAUNCHES DISTRICT 3 NEWSLETTER

City of Tacoma Council Member Keith Blocker has released the first in a new series of monthly e-newsletters for District 3. The publication is designed to provide community members with information on pertinent issues and events.
Topics covered in the February 2016 issue of Council Member Keith Blocker’s District 3 Community Newsletter include the City’s new partnership with the Tacoma Community Redevelopment Authority; the Cold Weather Young Adult Shelter on South 13th Street; the 38th Street Goodwill reopening; ongoing volunteer opportunities through the City’s boards and commissions; an update on minimum wage and specifics regarding the upcoming public scoping meeting on the proposed methanol plant.
“District 3 has visibly and dramatically evolved over the years,” said Blocker. “I am extremely proud of the work accomplished thus far and, as we plan for and work toward the ongoing growth and success of our area, it is critically important to keep community members well informed.”
Community members can subscribe to Council Member Keith Blocker’s District 3 Community Newsletter and other updates from the Office of Council Member Keith Blocker through the City’s website at www.cityoftacoma.org.

LEARN GOOD ORAL CARE AFTER 50

Our teeth can last a lifetime with proper home care and regular dental checkups. But after age 50, adults face a variety of unique challenges. Ignoring these issues can lead to painful and expensive consequences for their oral health. Over 30% of seniors have untreated cavities. Almost 25% of adults have periodontal disease and ultimately nearly 30% will lose teeth.
“Caring for Your Teeth after 50” will provide important information about effective oral care and health. Particularly after 50 years of age, the mouth and teeth begin to change. This is often compounded by changes in diet and metabolism, increased use of medications and other medical conditions. In addition, people visit their dentist less frequently. Oral health is also directly linked to many chronic conditions such as diabetes, heart disease and dementia.
“Older adults have to pay attention to their oral health,” said Aaron Van Valkenburg, Pierce County Aging and Disability Resources manager. “Good health, good diet and good teeth are closely connected. We want people to understand the connections and learn about the enormous benefits of ongoing prevention.”
“Caring for Your Teeth after 50” will be offered three times in February:
Feb. 17: 6:30-7:30 p.m., Sound View Building, Suite 200, 3602 Pacific Ave. in Tacoma
Feb. 18: 12:10-12:50 p.m., County-City Building Rainier Conference Room, 7th Floor, 930 Tacoma Ave. S in Tacoma
Feb. 19, 12:10-12:50 p.m., Pierce County Annex, 2401 S. 35th St. in Tacoma
The workshops will be presented by Claire Brannan, owner of Mobile Classes and Consulting. Clare teaches classes to caregivers and seniors to help them better understand common issues facing aging adults. Her presentation is sponsored by the Washington Dental Services Foundation and Pierce County Aging & Disability Resources.
All sessions are free and there is no RSVP required. For more information please call the Pierce County Aging & Disability Resource Center at (253) 798-4600 or (800) 562-0332. In case of inclement weather call (253) 798-8787 for possible postponement or cancellation.

APPLICANTS SOUGHT FOR HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION

Tacoma City Council is looking to fill nine positions on the Human Rights Commission.
The Human Rights Commission consists of 15 members who serve three-year terms and is comprised of representatives of the general public.
The Commission brings together diverse perspectives within our community from a variety of backgrounds including, but not limited to, persons with disabilities, youth, labor, religious, racial, ethnic, LGBTQ, gender and gender identity groups in the city.
For additional information on the Human Rights Commission, please visit their website at www.cityoftacoma.org/government/committees_boards_commissions/human_rights_commission or contact Andreta Armstrong at (253) 591‑5849.
Applications must be submitted to the City Clerk’s Office by Sunday, Feb. 14. To apply, please visit awww.cityoftacoma.org/cbcapplication or contact Amanda Punsalan at (253) 591-5178, .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address), or in the City Clerk’s Office, Room 11, Tacoma Municipal Building North, 733 Market St., Tacoma, WA 98402.

TEENS INVITED TO ENTER WRITING AND ART CONTEST

Pierce County Library System invites teenagers throughout Pierce County to show their creative talents in Our Own Expressions Teen Writing & Art Contest. The 20th annual contest runs Jan. 22 through Feb. 29.
Teenagers in grades 7-12 who live in or attend school in Pierce County may enter the contest, individually or in teams. Participation in the contest is free.
Judges will review writing entries for originality, style, general presentation, grammar, spelling and evidence of skill appropriate for the writer’s age.
Art entries will be judged on composition, evidence of skill commensurate with the age of the artist, creativity and effective use of media.
Pierce County Library Foundation will award $100 for each first place; $75 for each second place; and $50 for each third place. The awards are presented in three age groups – grades 7-8, grades 9-10 and grades 11-12 – in each of the four categories: poetry, short story, photography and drawing.
Entry forms are available at any Pierce County Library or on the Our Own Expressions webpage.
Contest winners’ work will be showcased in an awards ceremony at Pacific Lutheran University on May 25. Award-winning entries will be printed in a booklet.

SUSTAINABILITY EXPO SEEKS ARTISTS

The 2016 South Sound Sustainability Expo is looking for artists. Do you have art surrounding the topic of environmental sustainability? Display it at this year’s South Sound Sustainability Expo.
The pieces will be on display for over 1,500 attendees throughout the greater Tacoma area making it the perfect opportunity for you to connect with community members and gain exposure.
The Expo provides sustainability resources to our community and this year we’d like to take it a step further and feature art that expresses a wide variety of these themes.
This event is funded through sponsorships so there will be no payment to commission art pieces for the event.
If you already have an art piece or would like to create something new to display at the event, contact event organizers at sustainability.cityoftacoma.org. 
For more information visit www.southsoundsustainabilityexpo.org and check out photos from last year’s event.

APPLICANTS SOUGHT FOR EVENTS AND RECOGNITION COMMITTEE

The Tacoma City Council is looking for applicants to fill the District 4 position, and two At-Large positions, on the City Events and Recognitions Committee (CERC).
The nine-member committee consists of Tacoma residents, with representatives from each of Tacoma's five council districts, who bring a range of perspectives and expertise that focus on the City’s commitment to celebrate civic engagement and special observations. Committee members are recommended by the Economic Development Committee and appointed by the City Council.
The CERC serves as an advisory and action committee on matters pertaining to City-hosted events and special recognition programs. The committee is responsible for planning, reviewing and evaluating events, engaging the community in its fundraising efforts, and soliciting corporate and private sponsorships to leverage funds for City-hosted events such as the Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration and the City of Destiny Awards.
For additional information on the City Events and Recognitions Committee, please contact Kala Dralle at (253) 573-2523 or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).
Applications must be submitted to the City Clerk’s Office by Feb. 10, 2016. To apply, please visit cityoftacoma.org/cbcapplication or contact Amanda Punsalan at (253) 591-5178, .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address), or the City Clerk’s Office, Room 11, Municipal Building North, 733 Market St., Tacoma, WA 98402.

ARTISTS WANTED FOR MURAL ARTIST ROSTER

The City of Tacoma is now accepting applications from experienced artists or artist teams, working in any artistic style, to lead or assist with the design and implementation of outdoor painted murals in Tacoma in 2016–2018. Artists selected through this call to artists will be added to the 2016-18 Mural Artist Roster and may be selected for one of several projects, including murals with the Tacoma Murals Project and other mural opportunities.
Community groups approved for a mural in their neighborhood through the Tacoma Murals Project will select an artist for their site from the 2016-18 Mural Artist Roster, with a limit of one mural per artist. Approximately five mural sites will be selected in 2016. Murals at these sites will be painted in spring and summer 2016.
From time to time, the City of Tacoma may have additional opportunities to design and implement outdoor painted murals. The location, scale, timeline and needs for these opportunities will vary by project. When an opportunity arises, the City will consult the 2016-18 Mural Artist Roster to select a lead artist appropriate for the project.
Artists selected from the roster will work with the community to design and implement high quality, temporary, outdoor painted murals to strategically revitalize and beautify Tacoma. Mural designs will be based on the lead artists’ aesthetics and on input from the communities regarding themes or messages. Assistant artists will be paired with a lead artist, as needed. The City will provide mentorship to artists selected from the roster who do not already have extensive outdoor public mural experience.
Lead artists selected from the roster will be paid at a rate of $30 per hour for mural meetings, design and implementation. Assistant artists selected from the roster will be paid at a rate of $15 per hour for mural meetings and implementation.
Applicants must be professional artists, 18 years or older, and reside in Pierce county. The deadline for submissions is midnight on March 7.
Twenty-seven murals have been completed between 2010 and 2015. To see photos of these murals, visit the Completed Murals page on the City’s website at www.cityoftacoma.org.
Full project details, and the application, is available online, also at www.cityoftacoma.org. For additional information, please contact Naomi Strom-Avila at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or (253) 591-5191.

DOMINIQUÉ JINHONG DECLARES RUN FOR SUPERIOR COURT

Judge Dominiqué Jinhong, an experienced Washington State Industrial Appeals Judge and supervisor of the Crystal Judson Family Justice Center’s pro bono Family Law Program has announced her candidacy for Pierce County Superior Court Department 05.
Jinhong brings deep and balanced experience to her run. She began her legal career while serving in the United States Army Reserve as a Captain in the Judge Advocate General’s Corps (JAG). She has also served as a Deputy Prosecutor for Pierce and Thurston counties, where she championed adult and child survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault, and led the charge against organized crime as the leader of the Narcotic’s Task Force. Jinhong points to these experiences as shaping her passion for serving on Superior Court.
“As both a JAG officer at JBLM and former Deputy Prosecutor, I understand the importance of a strong justice system to communities across Pierce County,” Jinhong said, adding that Pierce County Superior Court has a “crucial role in protecting citizens and rebuilding lives of both victims and defendants.”
In addition to this body of work, Jinhong volunteers her time ensuring access to justice for those in crisis. As the Supervisor of the county’s Crystal Judson Family Law Program she founded a non-profit that mentors and trains new attorneys while providing pro bono legal services and resources to survivors of domestic violence.
“Our legal system is complex, and so many people who find themselves in a courtroom are coming from a place of crisis,” said Jinhong. “As a Superior Court Judge, I will work to ensure that everyone who enters my courtroom is given a chance to understand the proceedings and seek justice.”
Jinhong’s service has earned her extensive recognition from colleagues. In addition to being a sitting Industrial Appeals Judge, she serves as the President of the Association of Industrial Appeals Judges, an elected position reflecting her reputation in the judicial community for her knowledge of the law, integrity, and commitment to fairness.
Judge Jinhong and her family live in Fircrest, where she is an active member of her community, serving on the Supreme Court Practice of Law Board of Directors, Veteran’s Employment Resource Group, QLaw Foundation Board, Tacoma Rainbow Center Board, founder of the QLaw Foundation/Tacoma-Pierce County Bar Association’s Pro Bono Legal Clinic at the Rainbow Center, as Chairwoman of the Fircrest Civil Service Commission, and as liaison to the Washington State Bar Association’s Board of Governors.

COUNTY NAMES NEW DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS

County Executive Pat McCarthy has selected Libby Catalinich as the next Director of Communications. The first day on the job for Catalinich will be Feb. 8, with confirmation by the County Council to follow.
Catalinich will leave her positon as Senior Advisor for JayRay Marketing in Tacoma to assume the role of Director of Communications. Prior to JayRay, Catalinich served as the Director of Corporate Communications for REI and Senior Vice President of Public Relations for Washington Mutual.
Executive McCarthy cited Catalinich’s experience as the deciding factor for her selection.
“Libby is an executive leader with a three-decade track record of managing highly successful external and internal communications. I was impressed by her private sector background, professionalism and her eagerness to take on a new challenge.”
Catalinich will take over for acting Director of Communications Ron Klein who will move to the office next door and continue as the acting Deputy County Executive.
“Having Ron nearby is a major plus,” said McCarthy. “The Communications Director is a hands-on job with many responsibilities including managing the county’s website, communicating with the media, supporting all branches of county government and providing information to the public about county services. Having Ron here as the Deputy Executive will help Libby transition smoothly into this incredibly important job.”

WHAT CAN ARCHAEOLOGY TEACH US ABOUT THE PAST?

For most of us “archaeology” immediately calls to mind the golden death mask of Egypt’s King Tut, or an image of Harrison Ford as Indiana Jones, clutching a bullwhip.
But archaeology can teach us about more than religious or royal artifacts. It can, for instance, give us insight into the lives of ancient Greek artisans and their sometimes erotic wares, or reveal the harsh combat conditions of a Persian soldier in the 5th century B.C.
To share these stories with the South Sound public, University of Puget Sound is hosting two lectures sponsored by the Puget Sound Society of the Archaeological Institute of America (AIA). The lecture series is the result of a new role that the classics departments of University of Puget Sound and University of Washington have taken as co-leaders of the regional society of the AIA. Each year the Puget Sound campus will host two free public lectures, while University of Washington will host two free lectures in Seattle.
“It is our hope that by bringing lectures to the South Sound, we can help spread the love of archaeology and an appreciation of its treasures,” said Aislinn Melchior, chair of Puget Sound’s Department of Classics. “We aim to introduce students and the wider public to the kinds of things that archaeology can teach us about the past.”
The two lectures this year at University of Puget Sound will be:
“Sex and Other Things Sell: Athenian Potters and their Foreign Consumers” at 1 p.m., Feb. 6 with Kathleen Lynch, associate professor of classics, University of Cincinnati; Tahoma Room, Commencement Hall, Caskey Lecture (Note: The lecture will include images of explicit sexual scenes.)
“Warfare in Ancient Persia, 550–330 BC” at 7 p.m., March 10 with John W.I. Lee, associate professor of history, University of California, Santa Barbara; Wyatt Hall, Room 109. Ridgway Lecture
The February lecture, “Sex and Other Things Sell: Athenian Potters and their Foreign Consumers,” will explore how the foreign market for Greek vases influenced the art choices of Athenian potters. To provide a vivid example of the problem, Lynch will first examine erotic images of heterosexual couples on Athenian black-figure and red-figure vases, produced about 525–450 B.C. These Athenian-made pots have been found only in Etruria, the region today known as central Italy. Lynch will consider why the Athenians chose to market these images to the Etruscans, and, in turn, why the Etruscans may have appreciated them. Lynch will show the very different pottery found in genuine Athenian houses. She will then use comparative material to try to understand how and why the potters may have been aiming to create an “exotic” image of Athenians for their foreign customers.
The March lecture, “Warfare in Ancient Persia, 550–330 B.C.,” will look at the Achaemenid Persian Empire, founded by Cyrus the Great. Stretching from the Aegean Sea to the Indus valley, the empire was the first to exercise global power. To defend their realm the great kings of Persia mustered a diverse array of professional and part-time soldiers, including Iranian cavalrymen, Babylonian archers, and even Greek mercenaries. Lee will explore warfare in ancient Persia using evidence from royal inscriptions, excavated documents, tomb paintings, sculpture, and other sources, with particular attention to the equipment, training, and martial values of the empire’s warriors.

CALL OUT FOR PERFORMING ARTISTS

Calling performance artists: musicians, actors, playwrights, poets, dancers, and those of you interested in creative expression (even if you don't think of yourself as a performer).
This opportunity is a volunteer give/take in three parts:
1.) Experience a profound single day retreat-like Grief Recovery intensive. This is an experiential day engaging the tools to recover from losses of any type (not just death, but other relationship losses, pet loss, job and other transitions).
2.) Based on this experience of recovery, craft an artistic expression of this experience; and
3.) compile these pieces in a show presented to the community in May
Sherry Anderson has led two of these events previously in Seattle, one as "Good Grief" and another as "Grace and Purpose." Each one has been a delightful and creative presentation to the community of hope and recovery from loss.
By volunteering your time and craft to this cause, you come away with life-long skills to deal with loss. And the community bonds we develop over the next few months of rehearsal time are lifelong treasures. I hope you'll join us.
Information sessions will be held Friday, Feb. 5 at 6 p.m.; Sunday, Feb. 7 at 2 p.m.; and Thursday, Feb. 18 at 7 p.m.
These are the best opportunity to learn more and get answers to your questions. 
If interested, please text for address details: (206) 861-6490.

TCC NAMES ON OF TOP 150 COMMUNITY COLLEGES

Tacoma Community College (TCC) has been listed as one of the nation’s top 150 community colleges by the Aspen Institute College Excellence Program. This national recognition allows TCC to compete for the 2017 Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence and $1 million dollars in prize funds, as well as Siemens Technical Scholars Program student scholarships.
This is the first time TCC has received this national recognition by the Aspen Institute and is eligible for this prize. The Aspen Prize, awarded every two years, is the nation’s signature recognition of high achievement and performance among America’s community colleges and recognizes institutions for exceptional student outcomes in four areas: student learning, certificate and degree completion, employment and earnings and access and success for minority and low-income students.
“TCC is a special college – a place where students are warmly welcomed and receive an excellent education at an affordable cost,” said Dr. Tod Treat, Executive Vice President, Academic Affairs. “We are proud to offer a comprehensive range of programs that prepares our students for further academic success or a new career. And, we provide end-to-end counsel and academic advising for all of our students to help them achieve their goals.”
According to the Aspen Institute, nearly half of America’s college students attend community college, with more than seven million students working toward certificates and degrees in these institutions across the country. At TCC, average enrollment is 13,000 students, many of them working parents, veterans and returning students. As an “Achieving the Dream” (ATD) College since 2006 and ATD Leader College since 2011, TCC built a “Pathway to Completion” that has lead to steady increases in degree completion. It identifies and eliminates points where students may leave college, and identifies and creates points of student momentum, which retain students in their educational paths. Pathway to Completion emphasizes success within each pathway step, as well as the successful transition between pathway steps.
TCC offers nearly 40 professional/technical programs, including business, health care and legal services. The college is recognized as a leader in developing and implementing Open Educational Resources (OER), as an innovator in online learning and instructional technology, and as a pioneer in developing new degree pathways, such as the Limited License Legal Technician degree.
TCC and 149 other community colleges were selected from a national pool of over 1,000 public two-year colleges, using publicly available data on student outcomes in three areas:
· Performance (retention, graduation rates, including transfers, and degrees and certificates)
· Improvement (awarded for steady improvement in each performance metric over time)
· Equity (evidence of strong completion outcomes for minority and low-income students)
TCC will compete for the Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence. Ten finalists will be named in the fall of 2016. The grand prize winner and a few finalists with distinction will be announced in early 2017.
A full list of the selected colleges and details on the selection process are available at www.aspenprize.org.

  • submit to reddit

Comments