LeMAY CAR of the WEEK: 1967 Chevrolet Corvette

Corvette enthusiasts generally hold that the 1967 Corvette is the best looking and best performing car in the Sting Ray line. It was stylish, powerful and reliable. It was also the end of an era, of sorts.

The Corvette line was born in 1953, tapping into the post-war boom of muscle cars that mirrored the rise of rock and roll and road trips down Route 66. Sales were sluggish, however, but soon picked up as the Corvette gained a following. That changed in 1967, when a complete redesign was expected but failed to deliver until the following year because of aerodynamic troubles and tighter regulations on fuel emissions.

Safety and smog requirements would become the law starting in 1968 and the new regulations would affect performance cars profoundly, marking the beginning of the end for muscle cars with big engines and thunderous exhaust systems. But those rules were a year away, when the 1967 model rolled out. It offered five engine options available that paired with multiple carburetors to produce between 400 and 435 horsepower.

The 1968 Corvette finally brought the redesign that was five years in the making and also led to a dropping of the Sting Ray label. Since the beginning and ending cars of a line are always notable, the 1967 Corvette demands top dollar in collector circles. Selling for about $4,200 at the time, a museum-quality 1967 now reaches upward of $90,000 to $100,000 in today’s market.

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LeMAY CAR of the WEEK: 1967 Chevrolet Corvette

Corvette enthusiasts generally hold that the 1967 Corvette is the best looking and best performing car in the Sting Ray line. It was stylish, powerful and reliable. It was also the end of an era, of sorts.

The Corvette line was born in 1953, tapping into the post-war boom of muscle cars that mirrored the rise of rock and roll and road trips down Route 66. Sales were sluggish, however, but soon picked up as the Corvette gained a following. That changed in 1967, when a complete redesign was expected but failed to deliver until the following year because of aerodynamic troubles and tighter regulations on fuel emissions.

Safety and smog requirements would become the law starting in 1968 and the new regulations would affect performance cars profoundly, marking the beginning of the end for muscle cars with big engines and thunderous exhaust systems. But those rules were a year away, when the 1967 model rolled out. It offered five engine options available that paired with multiple carburetors to produce between 400 and 435 horsepower.

The 1968 Corvette finally brought the redesign that was five years in the making and also led to a dropping of the Sting Ray label. Since the beginning and ending cars of a line are always notable, the 1967 Corvette demands top dollar in collector circles. Selling for about $4,200 at the time, a museum-quality 1967 now reaches upward of $90,000 to $100,000 in today’s market.

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