LeMAY CAR of the WEEK: 1942 Chrysler Windsor Highlander

Chrysler offered the Royal and Windsor lines in 1942 that included features such as broadcloth upholstery, an electric clock, whitewall wheel rims, mirrored hubcaps, front carpets and "air foam" seat cushions. The Windsor also featured folding armrests in the rear seat. Optional on the Windsor line was Highlander plaid interiors for $20 extra.

The six-cylinder, Highlander of 1940 to 1942 shared the same distinctive trim package as the larger New Yorker Highlander, a Scottish plaid cloth and leatherette upholstery.

The Windsor first came out in 1939 and by 1940 came in either long or short wheelbase versions, as a six-passenger sedan, a six-passenger coupe, a convertible, a Victoria sedan, or an eight-passenger sedan.

The 1941 line added the Windsor Six Town and Country, a station-wagon type vehicle designed by David A. Wallace, who was the president of Chrysler at the time. Fog lights and bumper crash bars were optional.

Production of the Windsor ended in early 1942, because all automobile companies shifted to war production by order of the War Department.

The Highlanders from the era are noted for their eye-catching interior and comfort, but are also were difficult to maintain.

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LeMAY CAR of the WEEK: 1942 Chrysler Windsor Highlander

Chrysler offered the Royal and Windsor lines in 1942 that included features such as broadcloth upholstery, an electric clock, whitewall wheel rims, mirrored hubcaps, front carpets and "air foam" seat cushions. The Windsor also featured folding armrests in the rear seat. Optional on the Windsor line was Highlander plaid interiors for $20 extra.

The six-cylinder, Highlander of 1940 to 1942 shared the same distinctive trim package as the larger New Yorker Highlander, a Scottish plaid cloth and leatherette upholstery.

The Windsor first came out in 1939 and by 1940 came in either long or short wheelbase versions, as a six-passenger sedan, a six-passenger coupe, a convertible, a Victoria sedan, or an eight-passenger sedan.

The 1941 line added the Windsor Six Town and Country, a station-wagon type vehicle designed by David A. Wallace, who was the president of Chrysler at the time. Fog lights and bumper crash bars were optional.

Production of the Windsor ended in early 1942, because all automobile companies shifted to war production by order of the War Department.

The Highlanders from the era are noted for their eye-catching interior and comfort, but are also were difficult to maintain.

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  • Share on Tumblr