1961 Chrysler 300 G

Chrysler Corporation’s 300G is one of those cars that marked the end of one era and the beginning of another. It was the last of the 300 line to have the signature fins designed by Virgil Exner. Design changes from the previous year’s offerings included a new front-end design and a new rear that tossed out the “faux tire bump” that had been included on the car line that was supposed to be known as “The Forward Look” of automotive design. The1961 Chrysler 300G was powered by a “Hemi” with a “ram-inducted” 413 Wedge V8 that jumped the horsepower to 375 with a 400 horsepower option. They were not for the novice. Chrysler only produced 1,280 of its “letter cars” that year.

The 300 line drew its name from its creation in 1955, when the engine had 300 horsepower. That power marked the first time an American car had that much giddy up under the hood. Its suspension allowed it to hug the ground and corner much better than other cars in its class. These cars were all about high-performance and luxury. Each year’s model used a new letter of the alphabet as a suffix, reaching 300L by 1965, after which the model was dropped. Designers skipped the letter “I” however to not be confused with a rival’s car line.

Chrysler’s letter cars ended in 1965, following a redesign and a host of options and add-ons that did not fare well. Automobile buffs debate about the end of the line for the cars since the Hurst 300 appeared in 1970 with similar features, without the “lettering.”

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1961 Chrysler 300 G

Chrysler Corporation’s 300G is one of those cars that marked the end of one era and the beginning of another. It was the last of the 300 line to have the signature fins designed by Virgil Exner. Design changes from the previous year’s offerings included a new front-end design and a new rear that tossed out the “faux tire bump” that had been included on the car line that was supposed to be known as “The Forward Look” of automotive design. The1961 Chrysler 300G was powered by a “Hemi” with a “ram-inducted” 413 Wedge V8 that jumped the horsepower to 375 with a 400 horsepower option. They were not for the novice. Chrysler only produced 1,280 of its “letter cars” that year.

The 300 line drew its name from its creation in 1955, when the engine had 300 horsepower. That power marked the first time an American car had that much giddy up under the hood. Its suspension allowed it to hug the ground and corner much better than other cars in its class. These cars were all about high-performance and luxury. Each year’s model used a new letter of the alphabet as a suffix, reaching 300L by 1965, after which the model was dropped. Designers skipped the letter “I” however to not be confused with a rival’s car line.

Chrysler’s letter cars ended in 1965, following a redesign and a host of options and add-ons that did not fare well. Automobile buffs debate about the end of the line for the cars since the Hurst 300 appeared in 1970 with similar features, without the “lettering.”

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  • Share on Tumblr