1956 Chevrolet Bel Air

The Bel Air was a full-size automobile that was produced by the Chevrolet division of General Motors for the 1950–1975 model years. The LeMay collection includes a 1956 model, making it in the second generation of the car line. The first generation ran from 1949 to 1954 and came in two-door and four-door models as well as various convertible and sedan sizes, which set the stream-lined style of car designs for years to come. The Bel Air series featured wide chrome strips of molding from the rear fender bulge, to the rear bumper. The inside of this stripe was painted a coordinating color with the outside body color, and "Bel Air" scripts were added inside the strip. The second-generation Bel Airs added more styling and earned the "Hot One" nickname by car lovers. Unlike Ford and Plymouth models of the day, Chevrolet's Bel Air styling was considered crisp and clean as well and included interior carpet, chrome headliner bands on hardtops, chrome spears on front fenders, stainless steel window molding and full wheel covers. The 1956 Bel Air received a face-lift with a more conventional full-width grille, pleasing those customers who didn't favor the Ferrari-inspired 1955 front end. Distinctive two-tone body paint and sloping front and rear wheel openings completed the "speedline" restyling. The two-door wagons topped the price chart at $2,608, and only 7,886 were built. The least costly Bel Air, at $2,025, was the two-door sedan. Model now appear for sale for $35,000 to $100,000 depending on condition, extras and features.

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1956 Chevrolet Bel Air

The Bel Air was a full-size automobile that was produced by the Chevrolet division of General Motors for the 1950–1975 model years. The LeMay collection includes a 1956 model, making it in the second generation of the car line. The first generation ran from 1949 to 1954 and came in two-door and four-door models as well as various convertible and sedan sizes, which set the stream-lined style of car designs for years to come. The Bel Air series featured wide chrome strips of molding from the rear fender bulge, to the rear bumper. The inside of this stripe was painted a coordinating color with the outside body color, and "Bel Air" scripts were added inside the strip. The second-generation Bel Airs added more styling and earned the "Hot One" nickname by car lovers. Unlike Ford and Plymouth models of the day, Chevrolet's Bel Air styling was considered crisp and clean as well and included interior carpet, chrome headliner bands on hardtops, chrome spears on front fenders, stainless steel window molding and full wheel covers. The 1956 Bel Air received a face-lift with a more conventional full-width grille, pleasing those customers who didn't favor the Ferrari-inspired 1955 front end. Distinctive two-tone body paint and sloping front and rear wheel openings completed the "speedline" restyling. The two-door wagons topped the price chart at $2,608, and only 7,886 were built. The least costly Bel Air, at $2,025, was the two-door sedan. Model now appear for sale for $35,000 to $100,000 depending on condition, extras and features.

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