1942 Ford Super DeLuxe

The 1942 Ford Super DeLuxe was a car that most certainly was not destined to be a collectable. It was a car crafted in crisis. Introduced just months before the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor that plunged the nation into World War II, the production process was gripped with wartime shortages that made it less than durable.

Total output for 1942 ended up at a mere 160,432 units, making this the company’s lowest production year since 1910, and just 2 percent of total Ford production from 1932-48. The Ford Super lacked chrome except on its bumpers and grille because the nickel and copper used was a “war material.” Stamped steel horn rings and some grille parts replaced die cast zinc.

As the car industry shifted to war production, all trim on consumer cars had to be painted even if it was already chrome or stainless after a national directive was issued as a way to not put one car maker against another for “flashy features.” Cars in this era were called "blackout" models because they were ugly, drab and lacked the styling of earlier models.

Aluminum parts were retooled and made of a cast-iron alloy. Molybdenum replaced nickel in valves, gears and shafts. Ford's more massive look for 1942 merely followed an industry trend started by style-leader General Motors, and which had already been evident on Chevrolets – and Plymouths for that matter. The Super Deluxe packed a V-8 that delivered 96 horsepower through an automatic transmission.

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1942 Ford Super DeLuxe

The 1942 Ford Super DeLuxe was a car that most certainly was not destined to be a collectable. It was a car crafted in crisis. Introduced just months before the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor that plunged the nation into World War II, the production process was gripped with wartime shortages that made it less than durable.

Total output for 1942 ended up at a mere 160,432 units, making this the company’s lowest production year since 1910, and just 2 percent of total Ford production from 1932-48. The Ford Super lacked chrome except on its bumpers and grille because the nickel and copper used was a “war material.” Stamped steel horn rings and some grille parts replaced die cast zinc.

As the car industry shifted to war production, all trim on consumer cars had to be painted even if it was already chrome or stainless after a national directive was issued as a way to not put one car maker against another for “flashy features.” Cars in this era were called "blackout" models because they were ugly, drab and lacked the styling of earlier models.

Aluminum parts were retooled and made of a cast-iron alloy. Molybdenum replaced nickel in valves, gears and shafts. Ford's more massive look for 1942 merely followed an industry trend started by style-leader General Motors, and which had already been evident on Chevrolets – and Plymouths for that matter. The Super Deluxe packed a V-8 that delivered 96 horsepower through an automatic transmission.

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  • Share on Tumblr