1932 Ford Sedan Delivery

The one constant in the auto industry is change. Cars are always changing to fit the desires of drivers, while also staying profitable for the automakers. Sometimes car lines are tweaked between years, while other times bold moves are needed to recapture market share. Such was the case with the Ford Sedan Delivery of 1932. The automaker’s signature Model A was reporting slow sales. Ford needed a winner. Designers and engineers had worked around the clock to create the company’s first economical V-8 to meet the demands of car buyers.

Ford built “deliveries” by converting its Tudor sedans by replacing a quarter window glass with a steel panel and a large rear door installed for easy-access to storage. The 1932 Delivery had an inward-curved bumper that allowed for easy access to the cargo area by not requiring the driver to reach over the bumper. The car was designed for the small-end commercial car buyers, who might use the car for business deliveries. While it seemed perfect for that market, the pool of potential buyers was too small for large-scale production.

The Sedan Delivery truck was only produced for the last two months of 1932, and only 402 were built. That made it one of the rarest Fords of all time from the start. The fact that it was a commercial vehicle has since made it more rare, since business vehicles are often driven to exhaustion and discarded.

Those that survived their business careers have gone on to be prizes for collectors. Such is the case for the one in the LeMay Collection of America's Car Museum, which is an all-steel sedan body that was restored by well-known Dan's Rod and Custom in Michigan. The mechanical and finishing work was completed by John Stimac, owner of Hot Rod Shop of Wisconsin, however.

The modified car is now powered by a 1953 Mercury 286, Flat Head V8 with Ross pistons and dual exhaust. The transmission is a 1939 Ford three-speed manual that was completely rebuilt with NOS bearings. The body is all Henry steel with NOS 1932 door handles, original Grille insert.

The craftsmanship of the restoration and custom work has landed the car on the pages of Rod and Custom Magazine, CarTech's America's Coolest Rides Stationwagons and has won many awards including 2011 Goodguys Pacific NW Best Commercial entry. The car was donated to America's Car Museum by Gerald Greenfield of Lake Tapps.

  • E-mail
  • Share on Tumblr

1932 Ford Sedan Delivery

The one constant in the auto industry is change. Cars are always changing to fit the desires of drivers, while also staying profitable for the automakers. Sometimes car lines are tweaked between years, while other times bold moves are needed to recapture market share. Such was the case with the Ford Sedan Delivery of 1932. The automaker’s signature Model A was reporting slow sales. Ford needed a winner. Designers and engineers had worked around the clock to create the company’s first economical V-8 to meet the demands of car buyers.

Ford built “deliveries” by converting its Tudor sedans by replacing a quarter window glass with a steel panel and a large rear door installed for easy-access to storage. The 1932 Delivery had an inward-curved bumper that allowed for easy access to the cargo area by not requiring the driver to reach over the bumper. The car was designed for the small-end commercial car buyers, who might use the car for business deliveries. While it seemed perfect for that market, the pool of potential buyers was too small for large-scale production.

The Sedan Delivery truck was only produced for the last two months of 1932, and only 402 were built. That made it one of the rarest Fords of all time from the start. The fact that it was a commercial vehicle has since made it more rare, since business vehicles are often driven to exhaustion and discarded.

Those that survived their business careers have gone on to be prizes for collectors. Such is the case for the one in the LeMay Collection of America's Car Museum, which is an all-steel sedan body that was restored by well-known Dan's Rod and Custom in Michigan. The mechanical and finishing work was completed by John Stimac, owner of Hot Rod Shop of Wisconsin, however.

The modified car is now powered by a 1953 Mercury 286, Flat Head V8 with Ross pistons and dual exhaust. The transmission is a 1939 Ford three-speed manual that was completely rebuilt with NOS bearings. The body is all Henry steel with NOS 1932 door handles, original Grille insert.

The craftsmanship of the restoration and custom work has landed the car on the pages of Rod and Custom Magazine, CarTech's America's Coolest Rides Stationwagons and has won many awards including 2011 Goodguys Pacific NW Best Commercial entry. The car was donated to America's Car Museum by Gerald Greenfield of Lake Tapps.

  • E-mail
  • Share on Tumblr