1930 Lincoln L Brougham

he 1930 Lincoln Brougham, designed by the Brunn and Co. of Buffalo, N.Y., had everything a passenger of the “chauffeured class” of the post-Gilded Age could possibly ask for when it came to an all-around vehicle. Brunn called the car an All Weather Brougham because of the configuration of the two retractable tops that allowed the passengers to be in the sun while the driver could remain in the shade. 

The passenger compartment’s roof could even be folded back while a mixed middle section remained in place if the forward-seated passengers wanted to see the sky while the rear-seated passengers in the “jump seats” remained under the cover. The car’s design also shows the evolution of the Lincoln Motor Co., which was founded in 1917 by Henry Leland to produce Liberty engines during World War I. Leland founded Cadillac and sold the company to General Motors in 1909. After the war was over, he decided to re-enter the luxury car market with a new car, the Lincoln.

His first production model, the Model L, was produced from 1921 to 1930. It was a V-8 machine that overpowered the Cadillac. Costing up to $6,600 each, it was also a car reserved specifically for the well to do, although sales were disappointing because it lacked the fashionable stylings other car makers were offering.

Leland sold the line to car giant Henry Ford in 1922, which marked a turning point of the now iconic line. Lincoln was refined through the styling ideas of Edsel Ford, who crafted an elegant look that would soon make Lincoln one of the premier motor cars in the world. The 1930 model is seen as the top of that peak during the golden age of car making. The Lincoln Brougham town car offered a 90 horsepower, V-8 engine that was controlled through a three-speed transmission.

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1930 Lincoln L Brougham

he 1930 Lincoln Brougham, designed by the Brunn and Co. of Buffalo, N.Y., had everything a passenger of the “chauffeured class” of the post-Gilded Age could possibly ask for when it came to an all-around vehicle. Brunn called the car an All Weather Brougham because of the configuration of the two retractable tops that allowed the passengers to be in the sun while the driver could remain in the shade. 

The passenger compartment’s roof could even be folded back while a mixed middle section remained in place if the forward-seated passengers wanted to see the sky while the rear-seated passengers in the “jump seats” remained under the cover. The car’s design also shows the evolution of the Lincoln Motor Co., which was founded in 1917 by Henry Leland to produce Liberty engines during World War I. Leland founded Cadillac and sold the company to General Motors in 1909. After the war was over, he decided to re-enter the luxury car market with a new car, the Lincoln.

His first production model, the Model L, was produced from 1921 to 1930. It was a V-8 machine that overpowered the Cadillac. Costing up to $6,600 each, it was also a car reserved specifically for the well to do, although sales were disappointing because it lacked the fashionable stylings other car makers were offering.

Leland sold the line to car giant Henry Ford in 1922, which marked a turning point of the now iconic line. Lincoln was refined through the styling ideas of Edsel Ford, who crafted an elegant look that would soon make Lincoln one of the premier motor cars in the world. The 1930 model is seen as the top of that peak during the golden age of car making. The Lincoln Brougham town car offered a 90 horsepower, V-8 engine that was controlled through a three-speed transmission.

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  • Share on Tumblr